Water use of the new bioenergy crop Igniscum

 Transpiration and biomass production of the bioenergy crop Giant Knotweed IGNISCUM under various supplies of water and nutrients.

Soil water availability, nutrient supply and climatic conditions are key factors for plant production. For a sustainable integration of bioenergy plants into agricultural systems, detailed studies on their water uses and growth performances are needed. The new bioenergy plant Igniscum Candy is a cultivar of the Sakhalin Knotweed (Fallopia sachalinensis), which is characterized by a high annual biomass production. For the determination of transpiration-yield relations at the whole plant level we used wicked lysimeters at multiple irrigation levels associated with the soil water availability (25, 35, 70, 100%) and nitrogen fertilization (0, 50, 100, 150 kg N ha–1). Leaf transpiration and net photosynthesis were determined with a portable minicuvette system. The maximum mean transpiration rate was 10.6 mmol m–2 s–1 for well-watered plants, while the mean net photosynthesis was 9.1 μmol m–2 s–1. The cumulative transpiration of the plants during the growing seasons varied between 49 l (drought stressed) and 141 l (well-watered) per plant. The calculated transpiration coefficient for Fallopia over all of the treatments applied was 485.6 l kg–1. The transpiration-yield relation of Igniscum is comparable to rye and barley. Its growth performance making Fallopia a potentially good second generation bioenergy crop.


Mantovani, D., Veste, M., Gypser, S., Halke, C., Koning, L., Freese, D., Lebzien, S. (2014): Transpiration and biomass production of the bioenergy crop Giant Knotweed IGNISCUM under various supplies of water and nutrients. Journal of Hydrology and Hydromechanics 62: 316-323.

Lysimeter.jpg

Advertisements